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What are the Differences Between VCC, VEE, VDD, and VSS?

by: Jan 23,2024 2431 Views 0 Comments Posted in Technology

VCC VEE VDD VSS

The terms VCC, VEE, VDD, and VSS are used in relation to power supply voltages. Here are their meanings and differences.

VCC

• VCC is used as the positive supply voltage for circuits using Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJT).

• The "C" in "VCC" stands for Collector.

• It is commonly believed that the repetition of "C" twice in "VCC" is to distinguish it from the collector voltage (VC).

On the collector side of an NPN-type bipolar junction transistor (BJT), the positive supply voltage is referred to as "VCC." The collector of an NPN-type BJT is typically directly connected to VCC or connected to VCC through resistors or other means.

Circuits utilizing multiple positive supply voltages are often represented by different supply voltage labels such as "VCC1, VCC2, ...".

VCC is also employed as the positive supply voltage for operational amplifiers, where the internal circuitry primarily consists of bipolar junction transistors, and for Transistor-Transistor Logic (TTL).

Additional clarification:

"V+" and "V-" are also indicative of power supply voltages.

Therefore, when referring to the positive supply voltage in circuits using bipolar junction transistors (BJTs), "V+" can be used interchangeably with "VCC."

VEE

• VEE is utilized as the negative supply voltage for circuits using Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJT).

• The "E" in "VEE" stands for Emitter.

• It is commonly believed that the repetition of "E" twice in "VEE" is to distinguish it from the emitter voltage (VE).

The negative supply voltage on the emitter side of an NPN-type Bipolar Junction Transistor (BJT) is referred to as "VEE." The emitter of an NPN-type BJT is typically directly connected to VEE or connected to VEE through resistors or other means. In a single power supply system, "VEE" shares the same potential as ground.

Circuits utilizing multiple negative supply voltages are often represented by different supply voltage labels such as "VEE1, VEE2, ...".

VEE is also employed as the negative supply voltage for operational amplifiers, where the internal circuitry primarily consists of bipolar junction transistors, and for Transistor-Transistor Logic (TTL).

Additional clarification:

"V+" and "V-" are also indicative of power supply voltages.

Therefore, when referring to the negative supply voltage in circuits using bipolar junction transistors (BJTs), "V-" can be used interchangeably with "VEE."

The difference between VCC and VEE is illustrated in the following diagram:

VDD

• VDD is used as the positive supply voltage for circuits using Field-Effect Transistors (FET).

• The "D" in "VDD" stands for Drain.

• It is commonly believed that the repetition of "D" twice in "VDD" is to distinguish it from the drain voltage (VD).

On the drain side of an N-channel Field-Effect Transistor (NchFET), the positive supply voltage is referred to as "VDD." The drain of an NchFET is typically directly connected to VDD or connected to VDD through resistors or other means. 

In circuits with multiple positive supply voltages, they are often represented by different labels such as "VDD1, VDD2, ...".

VDD is also used as the positive supply voltage for operational amplifiers, where the internal circuitry primarily consists of field-effect transistors, and for Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS).

Additional clarification:

"V+" and "V-" are also indicative of power supply voltages.

Therefore, when referring to the positive supply voltage in circuits using field-effect transistors (FETs), "V+" can be used interchangeably with "VDD."

VSS

• VSS is utilized as the negative supply voltage for circuits using Field-Effect Transistors (FET).

• The "S" in "VSS" stands for Source.

• It is commonly believed that the repetition of "S" twice in "VSS" is to distinguish it from the source voltage (VS).

On the source side of an N-channel Field-Effect Transistor (NchFET), the negative supply voltage is referred to as "VSS." The source of an NchFET is typically directly connected to VSS or connected to VSS through resistors or other means. In a single power supply system, "VSS" shares the same potential as ground.

Circuits utilizing multiple negative supply voltages are often represented by different supply voltage labels such as "VSS1, VSS2, ...".

VSS is also used as the negative supply voltage for operational amplifiers, where the internal circuitry primarily consists of field-effect transistors, and for Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS).

Additional clarification:

"V+" and "V-" are also indicative of power supply voltages.

Therefore, when referring to the negative supply voltage in circuits using field-effect transistors (FETs), "V-" can be used interchangeably with "VSS."

The difference between VDD and VSS is illustrated in the following diagram:


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